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Photo edits/adjustments have always been a thing.

I really love a couple of photos by photographer Dennis Stock. I've seen his photo of James Dean walking in the rain on a cold and dreary day in Times Square so many times and I never get tired of it. The same goes with his photo of Audrey Hepburn as she's looking out of a car window down the the ground. Her smile said something and I still want to know what that was. ANYWAY, those photos have been adjusted in the darkroom SO MUCH in order for them to look as brilliant as they do, as they should have been. To not edit/adjust them would have not done them justice. They would have been good, but not as good as they are now.

I recently read a story about a photographer who was called out for making "too many edits" to her photos. When I heard about this, I realized that many people don't know what it takes to craft a superior image. Photos we take, every once in a while, come out great without having to make any edits at all, but there are so many occasions where we need to sit down and bring out the highlights, make the shadows darker, make the images cooler or warmer in tone, take out elements that may distract, etc. For me, it's part of our (well at least my) job.

Here are a few examples of what I've been creating lately. I'll take two photos, one which is crisp and one which is blurry, and overlap them and make tweaks so I can find that compelling piece. This is something I enjoy quite a bit. It's fun and I feel that we need to have fun behind the camera and in front of our computers. These are heavy edits, but the outcome doesn't look to outlandish. It almost looks natural. I've been shooting more, here in Tokyo, with that in mind. Stay tuned.



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